Glickenhaus SCG003

by • September 30, 2016 • FeatureComments (0)15456

Traum Motorsport and Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus’s customer racing programme allows ‘gentleman racers’ to get behind the wheel of an SCG-003 and compete in endurance races across the globe. There are three packages on offer – base, expert and professional. They all include car registration, insurance and delivery to the circuit, plus up to 16 crew, spare parts, fuel and tires.

Jim Glickenhaus’s dream seemed unlikely from the start. Back in 2013, he set out to build SCG 003—a supercar that could compete in the highest levels of international sports car racing, then swap tires and drive home, legally, on public roads.

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The Glickenhaus plan took on a more serious air in 2015. Following Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus’s appearances at the 24 Hours of the Nurburgring in 2011 and 2012 with the Ferrari-based P4/5, he brought two all-new SCG 003 racers to the ‘Ring. With a sensuous, serious body engineered by ex-Pininfarina manager Paolo Garella and a 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6, derived from Honda‘s Daytona Prototype engine and tuned by Autotechnica Motori.

However turning that racer into a road car, one you could insure, and drive? That was going to be a whole new challenge. However Glickenhaus and his team has risen to that challenge and some might even say surpassed it.

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The results of him and his team are a midnight blue SCG 003, it looks nearly identical to the car that raced at the Nurburgring, with a low, pointed nose, peaked fenders, and a dorsal fin rising off the roof like a comic book speed line. But there are details here that weren’t on the race car: Side reflectors; a third brake light, etc.

Yes, it still looks very much like the race car. That’s not accidental. Glickenhaus’s plan involves three varieties of SCG 003, all with the same body and bones. The one that competed at the ‘Ring is the 003C, “Competizione” spec—ready-to-race with a series-approved engine, a Hewland racing gearbox, and no concession to the DOT. At the other end of the spectrum will be 003S, for “Stradale,” a more luxurious offering with a sensible interior and toned-down aero.

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Right in the middle of the three-car lineup is where things get interesting. Glickenhaus’s dream really takes shape with the 003CS, “Competizione Stradale,” the car you see here. “This car could race the 24 Hours of Nurburgring as it is, with just an engine change,” Glickenhaus said. “What I wanted was for someone to be able to drive [to the track], put the car on jacks, put on slicks and race wheels, go out and run all day,” he said. “Don’t change the suspension, nothing. And then at the end of the day jack the car up and put the road wheels and tires back on.”

Key to this is the SCG 003’s modular design. Save for the door windows, which are bonded to the A-pillar and flex out at the rear for ventilation, everything on the car bolts together. That Lego-like modular design is the secret to making SCG 003 street-legal.

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Glickenhaus intends to sell The SCG 003 as a kit car, thus making it exempt from U.S. airbag and crash-test requirements. Titled as a home-built vehicle, it should be legal to register in all 50 states. The law still requires kit cars to meet new-car emissions requirements. SCG’s solution is to base its street engine on a U.S. emissions certified powerplant. Glickenhaus says the 4.4-liter reverse-flow twin-turbo V8, specially prepared for SCG by Manifattura Automobili Torino, will make roughly 800 horsepower and 590 lb.-ft. of torque, with all federally-mandated new-car emissions control equipment intact. Power will go to the rear wheels via the same Cima 7-speed paddle-shift gearbox used by Koenigsegg.

For street use, track days, and club racing, that 800-hp twin-turbo V8 should be plenty. But should you wish to enter your SCG 003CS in the 24 Hours of Daytona, your pit crew can simply swap in the race car’s 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6 and racing seats, and you’ll be ready to swap paint with Corvette C7.Rs and Ford GTs.

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The 003CS has the same dashboard as the race car, with dials to adjust ABS, suspension and a Bosch Collision Avoidance radar. The street tires, custom developed by Dunlop, have the same overall dimensions as the race-mandated slicks on 18-inch wheels; the 003CS’s AP Racing steel brakes are legal for use on P1 cars (Stradale models will get larger carbon-ceramics). The car even comes with built-in air jacks.

“My goal was to make a car that could handle at the top of the GT cars, but that still looked cool” said Glickenhaus.

Now to price. Glickenhaus says that if he can find buyers for 10 SCG 003s, he’ll be able to sell them for about $1.3 million apiece. Even then, he tells me, SCG won’t be turning a profit on them. Not that he has to sell any. Glickenhaus says he has “a good $10 million” tied up in the project, but it doesn’t bother him. “If you’re lucky enough to be able to afford it, never add it up,” he says of endeavors like this. “Worse comes to worse, I’m gonna have a street-legal one and I’m gonna have a race car.”


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